After shocking Wrestlemania defeat against Brock Lesnar,The Undertaker locked himself in the dark room for two weeks

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The Undertaker. Pic/WWE

WWE and Wrestling icon The Undertaker has revealed that he locked himself into the dark room at home for two weeks after his shocking Wrestlemania defeat against Brock Lesnar.

This was revealed by the Legend during the Bill Simmons Podcast session, as Undertaker talked about the night during which streak came to end.

“From watching it back, it was like boom, all the air got taken out of the arena,” Taker said.

Undertaker said that nobody knew he was concussed or injured during the match to make sure that everyone understood that the decision to end the streak wasn’t an audible during the match and that it was always the original plan.

“No one even knew,” Undertaker said. “Brock got hyper nervous about it but you could tell, maybe for the casual fan you couldn’t tell but anyone who follows our business could tell. My memory of that day stops at about 3:30 in the afternoon, that’s the last memory I have. My wife had come backstage as she normally does before I start going through my process, I had told her what was going to happen and calmed her down and that was it. I have no recollection of the match, it was 4 in the morning before I even knew what my name was.”

Undertaker talked about how long it took after that match for him to feel back to normal.

“I basically stayed in my room in the dark for 2 weeks,” he said. “I’ve been concussed before, but never to that level. I’ve never had the lingering headache and sensitivity to the light, that had never happened to that extreme before. It was strange. Not being able to remember, I had been concussed a few times and been able to finish the match and know when it happened but not that time.”

He also mentioned how he’s watched the match back multiple times to try and pinpoint the exact moment where he got concussed and can’t.

“I can’t,” Taker says. “I’ve watched that match so close and picked it apart and I just can’t tell. There’s nothing that really stands out, sometimes you can tell by the way your head hits something but I’ve watched it back and can’t pinpoint where it happened. I can get in the area because I can tell where my body language and pacing stops but there’s nothing that should have caused a concussion.”

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